Tag: health

In a funk.

I’m really scared. Scared for the future. I’m going against all my rules feeling like this. I tend to prefer to not dwell on what might happen with the progression of my MS. Because that’s just it. It only ‘might’ happen. There’s just as much a chance that everything will be ok. Which is why I see little point in wasting time worrying about it. That isn’t effective 100% of the time though. Like now for instance.

I’m not really sure what’s triggered it. I returned to work last Monday after six weeks off following my second round of Lemtrada and it was ok. As I’m on a phased return, I worked four hour days last week, today I managed five hours and tomorrow I’m going to try for six. And for the most part, since about two weeks ago I’ve been feeling considerably better than I usually do.

This weather is not helping at all though. Yesterday, I felt terrible. And all I could think about was the fact that I really needed to clean my bath. But I just didn’t have the energy. I could barely stand up for 20 seconds without feeling like I needed to sit down again. And still….”the bath needs cleaning Jo,” said that little voice in my head. All I could think about was that just for once, I’d like my whole bathroom to be clean at the same time. Not just the toilet, or not just the sink, or not just the bath.

But I left it. I just couldn’t do it.

Today. I’ve been into work and had a good day. And although I’ve had a bit of an upset tummy since I got home (this happened last year – damn immune system. It literally reacts to the slightest thing) I’ve been full of energy. To the point that I’ve done a load of washing, changed my sheets, vacuumed and guess what? Cleaned the bathroom! THE WHOLE BATHROOM! I’m sat in my bed now in an attempt to recover from that mass expenditure of energy, but I felt good whilst I was doing it, so I don’t really regret it!

Dave and I are in the process of buying our first home at the moment and it’s really stressful waiting for a completion date. But we’re having ALL the grown-up conversations in the meantime. The current debate is over having, or not having a cleaner. Because I can’t even begin to explain how knackering cleaning that damn bathroom is. And I can’t just wait for a random day where I have energy like I do today. It could be months before this happens again! And actually, even if I do have the energy levels for it, I’d rather use it on going out for a nice walk or on some other quality time with Dave and Poppy.

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 I mean, wouldn’t you rather hang out with these two than clean a bathroom?

It’s conversations like this that are making me fear for the future. I don’t know if it’s the very real responsibility of having a mortgage and desperately trying to find an insurer that will give me a half decent quote on life insurance (*NEWSFLASH*: getting a decent quote with MS – not easy. And don’t even bother with critical illness when you’re already considered critically ill). It could equally be that I read a story about a 46 year old woman who is living in a care home with residents that are mostly in their 80’s and living with dementia*. The system has totally failed her. It’s heartbreaking. She didn’t inflict MS on herself. She didn’t chose to have it. I know that life isn’t fair, but nobody deserves to live how she is living. And it just seems to have hit me that that might become my reality and it scares the living daylights out of me.

I know that right now I’m in a little funk that’s completely normal when you have a degenerative condition such as MS. In a matter of time, whether it’s days or weeks, I’ll snap out of it and start living in the present again. But sometimes I just need to let this emotion come out, rather than bury my head in the sand. The trick is remembering to stand back up and march on.

I’m ok. I really am. On a rational level I know that this is just something I need to go through, but I also know that there’s light on the other side and it’ll be ok.

 

*I didn’t go looking for this story. I tend to avoid it because I know that half the time the media only tells half a story anyway and is meant to sensationalise and make us all worry and fear everything. This was posted in an MS Facebook group though and I guess curiosity got the better of me.

“But you don’t look sick.”

I read an article earlier today which raised the point of being asked to give up a priority seat on the train. It stirred something in me and I felt the need to share my take on this story. 

Not long after I was diagnosed, I was on the tram in Nottingham during rush hour. I was knackered and my balance isn’t the greatest – especially on the tram! I also struggle with sensory overload and I’ve found that crowds, like when you’re squashed in like sardines, really unsettling. I’ve come close to experiencing panic attacks in those environments. So on this day, I chose to sit down in the only available seat. A priority one, which we all know are for disabled people, pregnant women or children. If we are sat in one, we know we should move for someone that gets on that needs that seat more than us. 

I really needed that seat that day. But someone got on with crutches and a broken leg. So I immediately got up and let them sit down. But the question is, should I have? But then how do other people react to that if I don’t? People certainly look at you with a certain amount of judgement. 

Recently it was brought to my attention that someone had questioned the fact that I park on site at work but I can also drag myself to the gym. Which in fairness I haven’t done for a while as I’m struggling with fatigue. Again, it’s that same judgement as on the tram. At work, we’re only allowed to park on site permanently if we are working a late shift, or if we are a blue badge holder. The alternative is that we park a short walk away on the Bolton Wanderers stadium car park. It’s roughly a 7 – 10 minute walk. No, I’m not disabled enough for a blue badge and I wouldn’t want to be disabled enough for one. I wouldn’t wish that upon myself or anyone. But what I can say, is I wouldn’t in a month of Sunday’s park that far away from my destination anywhere else. It hurts me to walk continuously for anything more than 5 minutes. The pain varies. Some days it’s like my calves are on fire, on other days my right ankle is really tight and causing a lot of pain. If it’s not that, I’m just bloody shattered and it’s a walk that I just don’t need. My legs feel like they’re being dragged through treacle.

But back to the gym. It’s not like I’m running on the treadmill. In fact I barely go on the treadmill. If I am in the gym, I’m generally lifting weights, in an attempt to keep my strength up. As it tends to be static, it doesn’t cause the same pain as walking can. And if I’m having a bad leg day, I just work the top half of my body. If I’m tired, I just don’t go to the gym but might do some yoga at home. The bottom line is, if you don’t use your limbs, you might just lose them.

The point is, when you have an invisible illness you’re constantly being judged. Yet it feels as though no-one takes the time to understand. Choosing to remain positive about your condition can be a poisoned chalice too. Because if I’m smiling, I surely can’t be struggling, can I? Yes. Yes I can. 

Actually, “how can you go to the gym, but need to park on site?” is an absolutely fair question. Without being in my shoes, I wouldn’t expect you to understand. Same as the priority seating on public transport. The message to take from this blog, is if you have a judgement about someone, seek to understand. And that’s whether it’s about an invisible illness or otherwise. 

Hey there, it’s Yogi (Bear)

Happy New Year! Hope you’re feeling good. Promise me you didn’t say “new year, new me” and said “new year, same old awesome me!”

Anyway, as luck would have it, my endless weeks of fatigue which have seen me not step in the gym for roughly two months has come to an end. So obviously, just as all the usual January hordes are turning up, I get my mojo back. Bloody marvellous. It’s ok though. I have a cunning plan for the next 30 days. THEN I’ll go back to the gym!

Last January, I signed up to Adriene Mishler’s 30 day Yoga journey. Because I never see ANYTHING through, obviously I didn’t complete it. I think I did about three days, decided it hurt too much and I couldn’t make time for it, and gave up. This year however will be different. This year I want to continue to just work on my spiritual, mind and body connection and I feel like Yoga is just another step in that journey. And this year, if I miss a day, that’s ok. I’ll just pick it back up again the next day. No-one, anywhere specified that it had to be completed in 30 consecutive days so I literally have no idea why I put that level of pressure on myself!

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This years journey is called “Dedicate.” Which I fully intend to “dedicate” myself too (I’m here all week!) Today was Day 2 and just like yesterday (and last year) it was really bloody hard. When I was in my late teens and early 20’s, I loved Yoga and was also a huge fan of Les Mills’ Body Balance. I was also about five stone lighter and three dress sizes smaller. And a lot more flexible. And MS hadn’t broken half of my nerves that help with balance!

It’s really bloody hard when you know how easy you have found it historically. It’s really frustrating. Something that I have previously found peaceful and calming is (did I mention) REALLY BLOODY HARD!!!!! Trying to find peace in all that huffing, puffing and complete lack of grace feels pretty impossible.

BUT!

This is a marathon. Not a sprint. Today was easier than yesterday. And my next session will be easier again. I’m on Day 2 of 30. Day 3 of 365. So what if I’m feeling more “Yogi Bear” than Yogi. We go on.

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In other news, I mentioned a few blogs back that I was exploring options to help manage my work-life balance better. Now that it’s agreed, I can say that I’ve compressed my hours. So I will be working four long days with a Wednesday off which will give me a little relief mid week. I start on Monday, and I’m looking forward to seeing how it might help me. Some people have asked me why I haven’t just dropped a day, but that would result in losing 20% of what I earn. Which is a lot! I don’t feel as though I want to do anything quite as dramatic as that just yet. Not until I’ve tried other options. And I really feel like this one will work for me. So I’m feeling quite positive.

I’m due to see Danny (my MS Nurse) in a couple of weeks for my three monthly appointment, and I have my blood test at the same time. I’ve resisted getting obsessed over my lymphocytes up until this point, but I’m going  to ask him where I’m at when I see him. I’m also planning to get back in touch with the counsellor as I want to get started on sessions. Although I feel in such a better place and feel as though I have turned a corner, I feel like I need to tackle any demons that are lurking. I might just be suppressing them.

Finally, I’m so excited to say that I’m going on the next part of my Reiki journey on 19th January. This will enable me to call myself a “Reiki Practitioner” and send it over distance. I’m so excited about this as I’d love to be able to send it to my parents who live a good 250 miles away from me.

All in all, I’m going into 2019 feeling really positive, and I hope you are too!

MS and Depression.

A few weeks ago, it came to my attention that I’m not as ok as I thought I was.

Dave came upstairs to find me curled up in bed crying my eyes out. I always say that he’s the kind of guy that you want around in a crisis, and he was true to form this time. He climbed into bed with me and gave me a big hug, letting me cry it out.

The conversation when I finally calmed down went a little like this:

Dave: “So, what’s up?”

Me: “This. Everything. Why me. It’s not fair. Life sucks. All I do is work and sleep. I don’t want to live like this. And I’ve not actually had a relapse since I found out I was diagnosed. I wish I was still going on, blissfully unaware, because I wouldn’t be feeling like this.”

Dave: “Your body has been through loads this year Joey. We knew it would be tough but it will be worth it in the long run. It’ll be ok.”

Me: “It doesn’t change the fact that life is so boring. I’ve lost my zest for life and I don’t know who I am anymore.”

Dave: “It’s ok. I don’t mind. We’ll be ok.”

Honestly. Always the voice of reason and I don’t know where I would be without him. He’s absolutely right. What’s really getting me down is that I’ve been using lots of annual leave to just sleep. And my weekends are just spent sleeping, apart from running a couple of errands. I sleep, and I work. Not the life I signed up for, and I imagine it’s certainly not the relationship that Dave signed up for. There’s a lot of guilt around the impact on him.

After spending some time reflecting, I’ve come up with some options for how I can make this work as we go into the New Year, but right now, I don’t know the feasibility of them, so watch this space for an update on that.

Other indications that I’m not as alright as I could be is that I have neglected my blog. I just haven’t felt up to writing. A lack of creativity is definitely apparent. I’ve been spending a lot of time on my own. I’m the kind of person that as soon as you text me, I’ll respond within minutes, but I’ve just not been up for getting into conversation. Generally a supportive friend, and happy to coach people close to me through difficult times and give advice, I just don’t feel up for taking on other people’s problems. I can’t be bothered to engage in trivial conversation. I prefer silence. If I’m honest, I’ve just not been feeling like me. I’m spaced out and so tired all the time. Dave’s working away a lot which is making me feel sad because I miss him, but it’s also giving me much needed space on my own which is good for my soul. Apart from the people closest to me, I’m just not feeling very “people-y” right now. It’s nothing personal. It’s just what I’m going through.

On paper, I’ve got all the symptoms of depression.

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Depression is common in people with MS. The first (and perhaps obvious) reason is that dealing with symptoms can really get you down. When people ask how you are you have options. Just gloss over how you’re feeling, in spite of feeling physically awful. Or you can be honest. Either option messes with your head. However you approach it you end up feeling rubbish. If I choose to hide it, nobody actually knows that I’m struggling. But then I’m mad that they’re not being mindful of how things are for me that day (yes, yes I know. Not their fault. I should have been honest.) But if I tell the truth, I risk sounding like a broken record. Because I’m always dealing with something in varying degrees of severity. Even on the good days. I honestly feel like I can’t win!

The second reason that people with MS suffer with depression is because the nerves relating to mood are damaged and sending the wrong signals to your brain. This ends up making you feel depressed for no apparent reason. It can do with this all sorts of moods, not just depression and people with MS are prone to dramatic and unexplained mood swings.

When I last saw Danny (my MS nurse), he gave me the details for an MS Counsellor. Through talking, he suggested that perhaps I’d not gone through a grieving process yet. I need to grieve the health that I’ve lost. Maybe future possibilities too. At the time, I didn’t really agree, but just a few weeks later and I’ve done a complete U-Turn on that. I definitely need to do some work on coming to terms with the past year. Whilst I regularly think of so many positives that MS has given me, I can’t help but think that they’re distraction techniques. So much of my positive approach to what I have been through has been about how I’ve distracted myself from tackling this head on. And maybe a little bit of denial. For a long time, it felt surreal. It didn’t really hit me. I’m thinking about it less now, but when I do think about it, I’m a cross between disbelief and distraught.

So what’s next for me? The medication I’m on for neuropathic pain, is also an anti-depressant. I’ve been in touch with the MS Counsellor and will also explore options through the employee assistance programme at work. I’m finally ready to work through accepting my condition.

 

MS: Business as Usual

Last time I wrote about MS, I talked about how I was working to be less defined by having it, and the response I got from people was overwhelming, as always. Although I don’t want to have it as the main “thing” that I always talk about, I also recognise it’s why I started this blog and many followers of it are here to get some insight into life with MS, so I thought I’d post an update on things that have been happening in life and how MS has impacted it.

About the title of my blog. I cannot remember for the life of me who it was so I can’t give them the credit they deserve, but they summed up it up both perfectly and hilariously that MS is just BAU*. And it really is. It’s not the new thing. It’s not the main topic of conversation. It’s just BAU.

We’re going through a restructure at work at the moment which has included a lot of people taking voluntary redundancy. I’ve chosen to stay. A huge part of this is that my current employer looks after me so well. Add to that the (admittedly simple) adjustments I need along with a blood test slap bang in the middle of a Tuesday every four weeks for the foreseeable future. Yet I’m not made to feel like a pain in the backside. I wrote a post not so long back about my fear if I ever had to change jobs. I get that any employer would have to make those adjustments by law, but I’d hate to be made to feel that it was done begrudgingly. The other key reason is that I actually love my job. So right now, I see little point in rocking a boat that doesn’t need to be. Granted, it’s an uncertain time. We’ll inevitably have to change the way that we work but how that shapes up remains to be seen.

Whether how I’m currently feeling is being exacerbated by the current situation at work I have no idea, but my fatigue seems to be through the roof at the moment and it’s the one symptom I find hardest to just ignore. Oddly enough, as long as I’ve got something to keep my occupied, I’m ok. As soon as things slow down though, I need some matchsticks to keep my eyes open! This was apparent when I had to take myself off home an hour early on Friday. I’d done everything that I needed to do and I just needed to get home to bed. I’d thought that perhaps I’d out slept my fatigue last Monday. I felt great and smashed the greatest gym workout in a long time! I was back in my happy place with an Olympic bar. On days where my ankle hasn’t been feeling so bad, I’ve even managed to run a bit. I’d crashed again by Tuesday though and I’m just learning to not feel bad about not being so consistent with the gym these days.

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Happy Place!

I saw Danny for my monthly bloods last week. It’s the first time I’ve seen him since the last day of Lemtrada and I was feeling pretty pathetic in a hospital bed. It was nice to see him and have a chat. He was really reassuring and said that I’m doing good. I probably needed to hear that. I have no idea what my lymphocytes (white blood cells) are at though! Many people who go through Lemtrada can get a bit obsessive with it, but I’ve chosen not to get hung up on the numbers. They mean naff all to me anyway since I’m not a medical practitioner and I just trust Danny to let me know if there’s anything amiss. It’s easier to just forget about it and let the people that look after me worry about it!

In other news, I was “supposed” to be doing jury service this week and next. Those that know me and my background will understand why this was so exciting for me. I know you’re not supposed to talk about jury service, however on the basis that the defendant ended up acquitted before we’d even set foot in a court room coupled with the fact that there were no further trials for us, I think I’m pretty safe. In amongst the disappointment I’ve got to admit that there was a shred of relief. I mean – bowel urgency in a court room ain’t gonna be a good look! Plus, with no sign of my fatigue going anywhere, I was worrying about how well I would be able to concentrate on the case. In fairness, I was honest with the woman that looks after the jury early on (she’s got a proper title but I can’t remember it for the life of me!) and she was amazing about how we could manage it. So if you have MS and get called up for jury service, my advice would be to be open and honest. They want to support you as much as possible.

In more positive stuff, I am absolutely LOVING Reiki. I’m going to talk about it at length in a future blog post because it deserves lots of words and attention spent on it! I’ve also finally had the chance to write my blogs for MS-UK, who asked me to guest blog for them about three months ago. In an attempt to redeem myself, I sent them a couple of posts that they could publish. They’re edited down versions of blogs I’ve posted on here, as they only have a 400 word limit. As soon as they’ve gone live, I’ll link them up here.

All in all, I feel like I’m coming to terms with my MS more and more everyday. On the days when I’m not overcome with fatigue, I feel as good as I get. And I can’t complain about that. It’s still shit. It’ll never stop being shit, but I’m starting to notice the gifts it has given me. Which is a story for another time…

 

*If you haven’t got the foggiest what I’m on about, BAU stands for “Business as Usual” and it’s a term used in the corporate working world for you normal, everyday work. There’s nothing special, exciting or exceptional about it. It’s just your average day.

 

 

10 Tips for exercising with MS

I’m in the process of trying to restore some normality to my life. On Tuesday, it was a year since I got told that I might have MS. Obviously it took another couple of months until I found out for sure, but I now feel that I’ve had my year of it being at the forefront of everything, and now it’s time to just get on and live with it.

Just to clarify, the mark on my top is water as I’m a mucky pup who can’t eat or drink anything without spilling 😂

To do this, I’ve been making tentative steps back into the gym this week. Dave joined the same gym as me, which is helping with motivation massively! I’ve been so nervous about going back since Lemtrada and with the ankle pain I’ve been having. I’ve learned that the ankle pain is triggered by walking for more than five minutes though, so it hasn’t actually stopped me training. As long as I’m doing more static stuff, I can train easily. I’ve had three sessions in the gym over the last week and I’ve been enjoying them. It feels good to be back. So here are my Top 10 tips for exercising with MS.

 

1. Be kinder to you!

I was always so tough on myself in the gym. If I skipped a session I’d feel guilty. If I had a bad session, I’d beat myself up. If I couldn’t hit that new personal best, I’d dwell on it for days. But these things just don’t matter anymore. They’re not the be all and end all. Now I’m so much nicer to me. If I don’t hit a personal best, as long as I’ve tried as hard as I can that day, that’s all that matters.

2. Be honest

If you have a personal trainer be honest with them. Let them know how your MS impacts you in general, but even more so how it’s impacting you that day. They can’t be an expert in MS, but with your honesty, they can tailor your training to fit how you feel on that day. It might also be worth being open with them up front, that you might need to cancel your training at short notice if you’re feeling particularly fatigued that day.

3. Listen to your body

Get to know your body and what it’s trying to tell you. Tune in to it. If your body is telling you that you can’t train today, listen to it. It’s ok to skip a session if you’ve not got much fuel in the tank. Some days you might just need to change the way you train. If your leg is causing you a bit of pain, don’t run so fast, or train your upper body instead. Maybe you need to reduce your weight and go for higher reps. You might need to take longer breaks between sets. Do what you need to do.

4.. Drink lots of water

We all know that with MS, controlling your body temperature can be a nightmare. I’ve literally overheated in the gym before and seen stars because I’ve got that hot. Drinking lots of water while you’re training will help keep your body temperature down. And on that point…

5. …Train near the air con

It keeps you cool and stuff! I find that wearing layers in the gym can be really helpful because as quickly as I get really hot, I can go freezing cold. Keep your temperature comfortable – it’ll make training so much easier.

6. Change the time you train

I used to go to the gym straight from work, but I find this really tough now. Many people don’t have the motivation to go back out to the gym at 8pm at night but this has two advantages for me. I get to have a bit of a break after work which helps to recharge my batteries. Add to that, training later makes me tired right before bed time so I get a better night sleep. You might find changing the time you train means you can have a better session.

7. Change your goals

I was always chasing a 100kg dead lift. I managed to get to 90kg, but it only happened once. Generally, I struggle to get over 70kg as my grip fails me. Grip is something I struggle with because of my MS, and I’ve learned that that will probably hinder me in achieving that particular goal. What I am good at though, is high reps. So my goal has now become less about strength and more about stamina and achieving higher reps. And I’m good with that.

8. Don’t waste time worrying what other people might be thinking

The other day, I was finishing my workout with a 3.5km/h walk on the treadmill. And the guy running next to me was looking at me as if what I was doing was kinda pointless. Before that I’d been dead lifting a 16kg kettle bell next to a girl lifting 75kg. I couldn’t help but think she thought I was pathetic. Firstly, it was unlikely that either of them were thinking those things, and secondly even if they are they don’t know that I have MS and anything someone with MS does in the gym is pretty damn awesome.

9. Remember you’re bad ass!

You really really are. We aren’t MS warriors for nothing. We grin through pain, fatigue and everything else we get stuck with. It doesn’t matter if you’re running 1k or 10k, or lifting 5kg or 50kg. You are bloody amazing for even being there, working out. As long as you can always be honest that you’ve tried as hard as you can on that day, you’re an absolute rock star in my opinion.

10. Don’t Stop!

My number one tip is “Don’t Stop!” When I was told I might have MS, I was physically no different to how I was when I was none the wiser. So there was no need for me to stop. I didn’t need to change how I trained in the gym (at that time). I did stop for a while which looking back, I regret. I should have carried on! It’s so important to stay active for so many reasons. It releases endorphins which can really lift your mood and it helps you to keep your strength up. There’s evidence to suggest it reduces relapses and flare ups. Most importantly, for me it has helped me to feel like “me”.

 

The come down.

I’m suffering from writer’s block at the moment. I’ve just not really had much to say or write, but I’ve also been enjoying spending my time reading A LOT! I’ve also been starting to read a bit more about Reiki Healing as I’m so excited to share that all being well, I’ll be doing my Level One attunement on the 15th September!

One of the books I have recently finished reading. I can highly recommend it. It was brilliant!

I know that many people who follow my blog are people who want to know what to expect from going through Lemtrada. With this in mind, I thought I’d give a summary of how things have gone for me over the last couple of months. Trying to get a picture from my other blogs probably gives you more of an idea on how my mood has fluctuated more than anything! I’m moving towards a better head space now which means I’m way better positioned to collate my thoughts!

So, where am I eleven weeks on, apart from sat eating a veggie burger with sweet potato fries and suffering from writer’s block?

The intense “MS fatigue” I was suffering in the run up to  treatment has more or less lifted. I can’t say that there aren’t days when it’s not there but it had got to the point that I was suffering every single day. I’m still shattered though and sleeping ridiculous amounts. I think this is just because my body is working hard to increase the bit in my blood that Lemtrada wiped out. It’s different to MS fatigue. I actually do feel refreshed when I wake up in the morning and getting ready for the day doesn’t feel like the plight it was becoming. As a result of my exhaustion not being even close to what it was, the Cog Fog isn’t so bad. Sure, words are falling out my head like it’s going out of fashion, but I’m definitely finding it easier to remain present in a conversation.

I can count on less than two hands the symptoms I’ve had to deal with as a result of going through treatment. And most have worn off now. For three weeks after I felt like I was coming down with flu and slept a lot. By five weeks after (just before I was going back to work), I started suffering with a bit of anxiety, but that disappeared by being open about it and having Reiki therapy. I’ve had real issues with stabilising my body temperature, but since the weather has cooled down, I feel loads better. It’s difficult to tell if that’s MS in general, Lemtrada, the fact that it’s been disgustingly hot and we’re ill equipped to deal with it in the UK, or a combination of all three. I suspect the latter. I was struggling with an iffy gut every other day at first, but my stomach of steel seems to slowly be working it’s way back to normal!

Then there was the itchy scalp. This still hasn’t really let up and I’ve tried changing shampoo and all sorts. My hairdresser said he can’t see a rash and my scalp looks in great condition. Whatever it is, the occasional anti-histamine when required seems to keep it under control.

​​Finally, there’s my legs. This is really hit and miss. Today, I’ve had no bother from the pain in my ankle in spite of the fact that I’ve been dragged round a car boot sale in the pouring rain. On another day however, with no explanation, it’ll reduce me to tears because the pain is so bad. Or the weakness means I can’t face using the stairs. I’ve started parking on the site car park at work which is making a difference to both the comfort levels of my legs, but also in managing my energy levels. I feel at the end of the day like I’ve got enough energy to go to the gym after work. Or at least I would have if I didn’t have the pain in my leg! I really want to get back to the gym actually. It’s getting me down a little at the moment that I’m in too much pain to go. I’m hoping to try going this week though on the basis that I might be surprised by what I can do.But that’s it.

Tiredness. Dodgy Gut. Flu-like. Anxiety. Unmanageable body temperature. Unreliable legs. Itchy Scalp.

That’s really not a lot is it? Not in the grand scheme of things.

It was getting me down though. To the point that there was a suggestion that maybe I’m depressed. I categorically disagree with this. I’m miserable, sure. I’m not disputing that but do you know what? I have every bloody right to be. I’ve been diagnosed with MS. I challenge you to find someone who wouldn’t feel at least a little bit pissed off!

I think what’s triggered it, is now that I’m through the diagnosis and the treatment, everything has just…stopped I suppose. It’s almost a come down. Not that I was on a high, but I can’t really find the right words to explain it. Things have changed though. Nobody is calling me brave or inspirational anymore so I don’t have to worry about living up to that (I’m ok with this by the way! I’ve said before, it gets kinda annoying because I’m only doing what anyone else would do in my shoes). But life is more or less back to normal now. What that means is it’s time for me to come to terms with everything. I’ve found the trick is just not think about it and to bury my head in the sand but I’m not sure that’s productive. I’m now allowing myself to feel my emotions whether that’s anger, sadness or confusion. A sense of “why me?” This means that emotionally I’m on quite the roller coaster right now. This could be being mistaken for depression.

Just on this point, I’m pretty sure that the place that the suggestion came from was 100% a place of love. I’m grateful for being looked out for like that actually. I’m not dismissing it entirely as depression is a well documented symptom of MS. I just don’t think it’s something I’m suffering from right now. I think I’m just fed up and need to work on my self-care to get me out of that place.

On an unrelated note, someone who didn’t yet know about my diagnosis found out last week. And he gave me the most honest response I’ve heard from anyone. He looked at me and just said “I’m so sorry to hear that Jo. That’s shit innit?” He said the one thing that couldn’t be closer to the truth and he didn’t run scared from it. It was genuinely music to my ears, to get such the response that I got. There was no trying to empathise, and there was no sympathy either. He just said exactly what it is. It just felt so real.

Maybe we can all learn a thing or two from that.

Coffee and Cake is always wondeful therapy!