Tag: symptoms

A (not so) new symptom

Yesterday evening, I was enjoying a nice relaxing bath when all of a sudden I found myself gasping for breath. I couldn’t get air in. I was terrified. Was I about to die?

When I eventually calmed down and righted my breath, I could work out what happened. I’d choked on my own saliva. Yes. You read that right.

And, it’s not the first time it’s happened. So it got me thinking. Embarrassingly, I regularly wake up with drool all round my mouth (honestly, this is actually more shameful than the time I admitted to shitting myself on multiple occasions). I constantly feel like I’ve got excess saliva in my mouth and my throat often feels like it’s quite closed up. Like someone is gently pressing on my airway. Is it all linked? (SPOILER ALERT – of course it bloody is!)

So I dufilly trotted off to an MS Facebook group. These guys and gals will know if it’s MS or just a completely different slathering problem.

As expected, many come back confirming that, yes, it is just another MS symptom. Honestly. It’s the gift that keeps on giving!

I call this a not-so-new-symptom because whilst it’s something that’s lurked for a while, this connection to MS is completely new. And to be honest, if I hadn’t had a near death experience (no I’m not being melodramatic, Mother) then it would never have occurred to me to even ask the question.

Anyway. I don’t really know what to do with this brand new piece of information (the GIF is for you Kat and Iain) other than just acknowledge it as another gift of MS and move on.

Out of genuine curiosity though I have two questions.

1) what in hell can I do about this one?
2) MSers, what do you do when you make a connection to an old symptom. Do you bother telling your nurse? It all feels a bit pointless because I’ve got it but do they need to keep an accurate account of all your symptoms?

HELP!!

Hungover?

We’ve all been there. Whilst thinking we’re on death’s door from all the sambucca shots last night we’ve sworn we will NEVER drink again. But within a few days it’s forgotten and we’re making next weekends plans.

Back in my late teens/early 20s when I’d be out at least four nights of the week. I had so much energy and suffered from horrendous FOMO so I was ALWAYS out!

Granted as we settle down, those night’s out are probably less frequent, but the bottom line is that the majority of us are still willing to have a hangover to end all hangovers in exchange for an awesome night out.

And why wouldn’t we? I think they call that living!

So how is this relevant to MS?

I need to get back to the gym. It’s a “hangover” I’m willing to have because the long term benefit outweighs any short term pain.

Well, I have to make decisions similar to this everyday. Earlier today, I was explaining to a friend how you often feel that when you make a decision to walk the dog, go to the gym, dance around your kitchen or indeed go out partying or drinking, people are judging whether you really are struggling or not. Because surely if you can do that, you’re fine, aren’t you? Right?

Wrong.

It’s a big decision, whether you do those things or not. Going to the gym is something you might do, not because it doesn’t cause you pain and is easy, but because you know that if you don’t, your disability will get a hell of a lot worse.

You might decide to walk the dog because the dog needs to be walked. It’s unfair not to.

You might dance around your kitchen because you used to love dancing and your condition has robbed you of being able to do it for more than five minutes anywhere else. And you might still go out because you want to retain as much normality as possible, you’re still human and enjoy socialising and if you don’t, chronic illness can be really bloody lonely.

You make those judgements for your own sanity and because you’re not going to let your condition rob you of living. You decide to do it because even though you know you might pay for it for days afterwards, what it will do for your soul, far outweighs the pain and fatigue that will come after it. It’s a conscious choice to have fun knowing full well what the consequences are.

Not unlike a hangover 😉

When the mind says “yes” but the body says “no”…

It’s been ages since I’ve written and I guess I just haven’t been feeling all that inspired to write. Having said that, I’ve got lots of ideas following my recent, amazing trip to Bucharest for the MS Sessions (more on that in a blog in the VERY near future).

But today, I want to talk about the mind/body link. Because today, mine are totally not on the same page, and haven’t been for the last month or so.

Some of you reading this will know that Dave and I completed on our first home just over three weeks ago. And it’s amazing. I truly, could not be happier.* But my word, isn’t moving exhausting? There’s been a never ending stream of flat pack, boxes, admin, decorating and just “stuff to do”. Throw a trip to Bucharest in the middle of it all and you end up with one exhausted MSer.

Home 🙂

I try to slow down, but my brain is constantly thinking of the (what seems like) 1,001 things that I need to do. Add to that, I’ve been crazy busy at work this week and I’m just feeling a little overwhelmed. I’m not living in the present – I’m constantly looking at the next task.

Let’s back track a second.

The day after I got back from Bucharest, Dave and I headed out to do a food shop. And for the first time I felt like my disability wasn’t invisible anymore. I was walking along with stiff legs. My knees just wouldn’t bend. My balance was way off. I’d gotten out of bed that morning and had fallen straight back in.

My first thought was “shit, am I having a relapse?” A couple of weeks on and I’m almost certain that I’m not. I’m just bloody exhausted. BUT I WON’T SLOW DOWN!

I’ve got fellow MSers left, right and centre telling me to “slow the hell down” but I’m not doing it.

And now I find myself lying flat on the bed with every bone and muscle in the lower half of my body aching. All comprehension and reasoning in my brain is gone. Ask my a question and I have no idea what the answer is.

It’s my own fault. I insisted on going out and doing a food shop today. I know, I know, but Lidl don’t deliver and they’re WAY more cheaper. By the time I got home I was physically exhausted. My legs hurt, my hips hurt and my feet hurt. I wanted to cry in pain. I did for about five minutes but got in bed with Pops (my dog) and we had a nap.

The second I woke up (feeling much better), I jumped up and I’m doing all sorts of crap that really does not need to be done yet. And now I’m back in bed in pain again. I know. I’m an idiot.

The thing is, sometimes I don’t feel mentally exhausted. I have so much clarity and I feel like I can take on the world. And I’ll just keep on pushing through the pain to get the job done. I need someone to tell me to stop. Which Dave did eventually do today. After I got up and I started trying to unpack the last boxes, he walks in like “what on earth are you doing?!” and promptly tells me to go and put my feet up.

Thing is, when I don’t feel tired, it’s tough to stop me. I physically find it hard to just sit and do nothing. I get restless. I’ll keep on going until the pain cripples me and someone tells me to stop being a hero and sit down.

A friend and fellow MSer, Ilise just sent me this and it is so appropriate.

Really, what I need to do is learn to accept that almost everything really can wait until tomorrow. I don’t have to constantly live “getting shit done” and at 100mph. And let’s face it, the only person beating me up when it’s not getting done, is me.

*That’s a lie. I’d be happier if the used tea bags actually made their way to the bin and if he bought 3ply loo roll and not 2, but I can just about live with it 😂

Just when you think things are getting better…

It’s been a couple of weeks since I posted about my experience of Lemtrada Round 2 and now seemed like a good time to check in. Mostly because I’m sat in the doctors waiting room (again) with little else to do.

So last time I wrote, I ‘probably’ had cellulitis and the rash wasn’t abating. Since then I’ve had a course of penicillin which seems to have done the trick on the cellulitis.

Thing was, I was taking 25 tablets a day and quite frankly the thought of another tablet made me want to throw up. So despite the rash, I decided that just for a day I’d knock the anti-histamine and paracetamol on the head. As it turned out, the next day the rash did finally subside so I didn’t bother taking them anymore after that.

On Monday however, my itchy scalp (remember that from last year?) started, so I figured I’d just take another one of the anti-histamines that I was prescribed in hospital (chlorophenamine, which is basically piriton). Within minutes my skin flared up. I broke out in hives almost all over my body. The very same rash I’d had that I was trying to combat.

So the medication I’d been taking to beat the rash was giving it to me. Oh the irony.

Much to the amusement of many of my friends on Facebook, after a bit of googling for home remedies on Tuesday morning, I had a bath in porridge oats. It has anti-inflammatory properties and much to my surprise really helped. Once I was out I slathered myself in what was quite frankly an offensive amount of aloe vera gel and ended up spending the majority of the day sleeping.

By Wednesday, it hadn’t shifted. I popped into a local Pharmacy which suggested trying a different anti-histamine but nothing has changed. If anything it’s got worse.

Overnight has been horrendous. I’ve never sweat or itched more. It’s unbearable and I’ve now given up on waiting for it to ease on its own and am now sat waiting to see the doc.

It’s definitely not been easy this time around.

A week in the life of an MSer – Monday

As March is MS awareness month, I thought I’d write a series on a week in the life of an MSer. I’ll write everyday but I might not get them posted everyday but I’ll do my best!

Enjoy!

6.40am Wake Up
Although I feel groggy, there’s no aches this morning which is a relief as my ankle has been giving me quite a bit of hassle over the last few weeks.

8.02am – Arrive at work
Get into work and log on. Catch up with a couple of colleagues about how my weekend was. We just slept a lot this weekend which was much needed!

9.30am – Toilet Trip
Luckily I’m like clockwork in the toilet department. Because of certain nerves that are damaged, I don’t usually realise I need to go for a number two until it’s VERY short notice 🙈

11am – I need something to do
I’ve run out of stuff to do. And this is when my fatigue really sets in. Even though I’ve slept all weekend I’m feeling tired. Fatigue always gets worse when I haven’t got stuff to distract me from it.

Midday – Found stuff to do
I’ve managed to find something to keep me occupied and I’m feeling better for it. It’s a bit early for dinner though. I work longer days so although colleagues are going for lunch, I’ll probably leave it another hour or so

1pm – Lunch
I take my lunch on my own – the time on my own helps me recharge my batteries. I tend to switch off with a book for half an hour. I never used to take my dinner and I was really struggling with fatigue. So I’m now trying to behave myself and actually take my dinner break!

4.30pm – Final Stretch
I always used to have finished work by now, but I’ve changed my shift pattern this year. I now work four longer days with a Wednesday off. It’s really working for me, having that rest in the middle

6pm – Finished!
Today has been a good day but it’s not done yet. This evening I’m heading over to an Essential Oil and Chakra course. I’ll grab food on the go.

9.30pm – Finally home
It’s been a really long day so I’m straight in my pyjamas with my feet up catching up on MasterChef! I’m starting to feel the tingling a bit more prominent in my feet and have a bit of restless legs. This is totally normal when I’ve been really busy all day. No pain though. I’ll also take 4000iu of Vitamin D.

10.40pm – Sleep meditation
My “sunrise/sunset” alarm clock goes off at 10.45pm so it’s time for a quick 5 minute meditation which I can guarantee will send me to sleep!

“But you don’t look sick.”

I read an article earlier today which raised the point of being asked to give up a priority seat on the train. It stirred something in me and I felt the need to share my take on this story. 

Not long after I was diagnosed, I was on the tram in Nottingham during rush hour. I was knackered and my balance isn’t the greatest – especially on the tram! I also struggle with sensory overload and I’ve found that crowds, like when you’re squashed in like sardines, really unsettling. I’ve come close to experiencing panic attacks in those environments. So on this day, I chose to sit down in the only available seat. A priority one, which we all know are for disabled people, pregnant women or children. If we are sat in one, we know we should move for someone that gets on that needs that seat more than us. 

I really needed that seat that day. But someone got on with crutches and a broken leg. So I immediately got up and let them sit down. But the question is, should I have? But then how do other people react to that if I don’t? People certainly look at you with a certain amount of judgement. 

Recently it was brought to my attention that someone had questioned the fact that I park on site at work but I can also drag myself to the gym. Which in fairness I haven’t done for a while as I’m struggling with fatigue. Again, it’s that same judgement as on the tram. At work, we’re only allowed to park on site permanently if we are working a late shift, or if we are a blue badge holder. The alternative is that we park a short walk away on the Bolton Wanderers stadium car park. It’s roughly a 7 – 10 minute walk. No, I’m not disabled enough for a blue badge and I wouldn’t want to be disabled enough for one. I wouldn’t wish that upon myself or anyone. But what I can say, is I wouldn’t in a month of Sunday’s park that far away from my destination anywhere else. It hurts me to walk continuously for anything more than 5 minutes. The pain varies. Some days it’s like my calves are on fire, on other days my right ankle is really tight and causing a lot of pain. If it’s not that, I’m just bloody shattered and it’s a walk that I just don’t need. My legs feel like they’re being dragged through treacle.

But back to the gym. It’s not like I’m running on the treadmill. In fact I barely go on the treadmill. If I am in the gym, I’m generally lifting weights, in an attempt to keep my strength up. As it tends to be static, it doesn’t cause the same pain as walking can. And if I’m having a bad leg day, I just work the top half of my body. If I’m tired, I just don’t go to the gym but might do some yoga at home. The bottom line is, if you don’t use your limbs, you might just lose them.

The point is, when you have an invisible illness you’re constantly being judged. Yet it feels as though no-one takes the time to understand. Choosing to remain positive about your condition can be a poisoned chalice too. Because if I’m smiling, I surely can’t be struggling, can I? Yes. Yes I can. 

Actually, “how can you go to the gym, but need to park on site?” is an absolutely fair question. Without being in my shoes, I wouldn’t expect you to understand. Same as the priority seating on public transport. The message to take from this blog, is if you have a judgement about someone, seek to understand. And that’s whether it’s about an invisible illness or otherwise.